You know it’s getting warm when…

The way I can tell that it’s definitely getting warmer down here is when I dig out the summer clothes from the suitcases they’ve been packed in all winter and throw them in the washer.  Because heaven knows I never wash them until it’s time to wear them! 

But it’s time.  The temps are reaching up into the low to mid 80s during the day and, for us, the humidity is high.  Yesterday, March 4th, the humidity was at a “steamy” 46%.  For someone like me who lived in New Orleans and the Everglades, that’s a nice level of moisture in the air.  But for someone like me who lived in Death Valley and has lived here for three years, that’s pretty darn high.

According to our local weather guy, it’s been 158 days since our last rain.  And we’re probably looking at another 88 days at least until we get our next measureable rainfall.  I guess you could, then, consider that the dry season has been g0ing on for quite some time.  Because the temperatures have been cool, none of us here at Lake Chapala really start thinking that we’re going into the dry season until the highs start hitting about 80.

But it has now been about two weeks that we’ve gone above 80 everyday, so I believe that a straw poll would back me up when I say this is it.  Hola y buenos tardes, dry season!  Nice to see you again, but hope you won’t be staying too long. 

Dry season is when the dry lakebeds on the other side of the mountains to the west of Jocotepec are full of dust devils and the time during which all that dust is being picked up and blown over the mountains directly into our homes and gardens and pools here at Lake Chapala.  The floors in our homes and the leaves on our plants are coated with dust.  It’s the time when the snowbirds pack up and get out of here. 

It’s the time when the hills north of us that divide us from Guadalajara look like this:

 instead of this: 

Using my rule of thumb for the beginning of the dry season …. two weeks of 80 degree plus Fahrenheit temperatures and no rain for an extended period, the dry season is starting much earlier this year.  What that means, of course, is that we’re now talking about the rainy season starting early. 

That probably doesn’t make any more sense than saying that after flipping a coin and getting eight heads in a row that the next one is much more likely to come up tails.  Isn’t so, of course, the odds are still 50/50 that the next flip of the coin will come up heads.  But if I were a betting woman … and I am … and even knowing that 50/50 thing, I’d still put my money on tails coming up.  And I’m still putting my money on the rainy season starting early.  Bless my heart.

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About Barbara

in april of 2008, i moved from the united states to mexico. during my working days, i held lots and lots of jobs....almost all chosen because they were fun or interesting instead of how much they paid. when i started thinking about retirement (in my 40s), i realized that i would never be able to retire to a country where english was the native language. and although i had traveled to every state in the US -- and lived in lots of them -- i had never been outside the country with the exception of canada and mexico. and since you now know that i could never afford to retire in canada (even to the french-speaking area), mexico won by default.
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5 Responses to You know it’s getting warm when…

  1. Joe Jensen says:

    Sounds like a good time of year……….warmin’ up and snowbirds goin’ home

    • Barbara says:

      well, joe, it’s better than yours! got run out of your place by wildfires already, i hear. glad that you all … with the exception of a few chickens … made it out and back in okay.

      • J A Jensen says:

        Actually I’m kinda green with envy. Your weather sounds pretty sweet. Does it ever get cold?

  2. Hi Barbara, I would like to meet you sometime. Maybe I could take the bus to Jocotopec or you could come to Ajijic? Since breaking my ankle, I can’t walk very far so if I went to Jocotopec it would have to be close to the bus stop. E mail me if you are interested. Do you come to Ajijic very often? Or the Lake Chapala Society? Thanks, Patricia

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