Cuyutlan, Colima, the ocean and the beach

After my last post, my friend Lulu asked if I was going to post some photos of the beach and ocean, and I told her that I would.  Generally, I’m not crazy about snaps of beaches and oceans because they really don’t capture the feel of being there.  And these don’t.

Every once in awhile you might get lucky and get some great photograph, but generally they all look the same, like mine do.  However, because Lulu is a good friend of mine and she asked for them, here they are.

This was taken on the beach right outside the gate of the casita in Cuyutlan about sunset.  The beach umbrella apparently belongs to a neighbor, but he told Jonnie that we were welcome to use it.

The beaches around Cuyutlan are “black” (i.e. composed of volcanic residue).  And they are powdery, not granular like white sand beaches.

The Pacific had rollers the entire time we were there.  Didn’t matter much whether it was low tide or high tide, the waves (olas, in Spanish) kept coming on in.

And, with two exceptions, we didn’t see anyone on the beach for the entire three nights/four days that we stayed at the casita.

The beach next to the malecon in downtown Cuyutlan had, of course, many more visitors, and lots more beach umbrellas.

The chairs and tables on the beach were for rent by the restaurants appurtenant thereto.  (After all these years, there are some phrases that I still retain from my stint as a legal secretary in New Orleans!)  As I recall, the cost was 100 pesos a day for a table and four chairs.  And you might even be able to enjoy some live Mexican music.

Restaurants also rented swimming pools for kids!  While the surf did not look particularly dangerous, red flags were flying the entire time we were there, indicating high surf or treacherous  currents.  So renting a plastic swimming pool for the kids to play in was probably a good idea.

And you can always rent a few more chairs if need be.  I was thrilled to see these kinds of beach chairs.  Unlike the molded plastic chairs normally seen around here, these reminded me of the kind we had when I was a kid, except that ours had striped material.

You can also rent boogie boards by the hour from most of the restaurants.

So if you are taking the family to the beach in Cuyutlan, there’s no need to overpack.  From shops selling bathing suits and beach cover ups to restaurants renting various sizes of plastic swimming pools, it’s all available in Cuyutlan.

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About Barbara

in april of 2008, i moved from the united states to mexico. during my working days, i held lots and lots of jobs....almost all chosen because they were fun or interesting instead of how much they paid. when i started thinking about retirement (in my 40s), i realized that i would never be able to retire to a country where english was the native language. and although i had traveled to every state in the US -- and lived in lots of them -- i had never been outside the country with the exception of canada and mexico. and since you now know that i could never afford to retire in canada (even to the french-speaking area), mexico won by default.
This entry was posted in Food, Fun Stuff, Getting Older, Lake Chapala, Travel, Weather and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Cuyutlan, Colima, the ocean and the beach

  1. K says:

    Did you know that Cuyutlan is the place to see the Green Wave in Feb/March?
    It’s famous for that. OMG, we’ve gone to the beach there and just had a drink but never ‘rented’ the chairs we used. What losers wer are.

    • Barbara says:

      oh, yeah, totally knew about the green wave…and not the Tulane one!

      and i understand from cuyutlan’s one policeman that he’s looking for you!!!!

  2. Barbara says:

    nope, i’m pretty sure that he’s not named frank. but i DO think he’s after you for sitting in those unpaid for chairs!!!

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